Top Festivals Around the World in March

Published in World Festivals

Top Festivals Around the World in March


The Carnival of Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: 2nd-9th March 2019 (9-18 February  2018) A week festival that is held before lent every year with two million people per day, with an extravagant parade, dancing, colours and alcohol that makes this one of the most exciting and well-known festivals in the world. Find out more.

Mardi Gras

New Orleans, USA: 5th March 2019 (February 13, 2018) Mardi Gras, or "Fat Tuesday," The most popular time to visit New Orleans, is the last day of the Carnival season and never disappoints with beads, parades, music and dance. Find out more.

The Battle of the Oranges

Ivrea, Italy: 2nd-5th March 2019
(10-13 February 2018) An enormous food fight where people form organised teams and throw oranges at each other. Find out more.

Frozen Dead Guy Days

Nederland, Colorado: 9th- 11th March 2019
Known as one of the most unique and quirky festivals in the USA, Frozen Dead Guy Days takes place in the Colorado mountain town of Nederland, with three days of frosty hilarity featuring 30 live bands in heated tents and outrageous events like coffin races, costumed polar plunging, frozen t-shirt contests and much more. Find out more.

Calle Ocho

Miami, Florida, USA: 10th March 2019 (11th March 2018) Let the Latin beat take you away at the Calle Ocho street festival in Miami's Little Havana. An exciting Cuban street festival in Little Havana, with food and live music. Find out more.

Las Fallas

Valencia, Spain: 15th-19th March 2019 Las Fallas is undoubtedly one of the most unique festivals in Spain - a Spanish fiesta where the whole town is literally set alight. The focus of the festival is the creation and burning of giant carton floats. Find out more.

Saint Patrick’s Day Festival

Dublin, Ireland: 17th March
 2019 Irelands national holiday of parades, costumes, music, comedy, films, and drinking. It is a festival like no other that needs to be added to your bucketlist. Find out more.

Holi Festival

India: 20th -21st March 2019 
(1st-2nd March 2018) A Hindus and Sikh Festival, in India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka that celebrates the triumph of 'good' over 'bad'. The main day of this incredibly fun 16-day religious festival is honoured by throwing coloured powder and water at each other. Find out more.

Ultra Music Festival

Miami, Florida:
 29th- 31st March 2019 The world's premier electronic music festival, boasting elite DJs and unparalleled production located in the beautiful city of Miami. Find out more.

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Top Festivals Around the World in April

Published in World Festivals

Top Festivals Around the World in April


Songkran Water Festival

Bangkok, Thailand: 13th- 15th April 2019 (13-15th April 2018) The Thai New Year festival falls on some of the hottest days in Thailand, and people celebrate by throwing water on each other, using water guns, buckets, hoses and even elephants. Find out more.

Sant Jordi Festival

Barcelona, Catalonia 23rd Apil 2019 
(23rd April 2018) Roses, books and lovers: Barcelona is full of them on 23 April. In Catalonia, the World Book Day becomes an especially romantic festivity. The people in Catalonia celebrate the day of their patron saint, Sant Jordi, with a curious tradition. Find out More.

Koningsdag (King’s Day)

Amsterdam, Netherlands: 27th April 2019 (27th April 2018) King's Day festivities invite locals and visitors alike to soak up Amsterdam's open-air fun. In the streets, canals, parks and everywhere in between, the city is bursting with orange as Amsterdammers enjoy the biggest street party of the year.
Find out more.

Sandfest, Port Aransas

Texas, USA: 27th-29th April 2019
An amazing sand sculpture contest with live entertainment. wander through the incredibly unique artistic displays of the largest sand sculpting fest and competition in the nation, that brings over 100,000 guests to the beaches of Port Aransas. Find out More.

 

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Top Festivals Around the World in January

Published in World Festivals

Top Festivals Around the World in January

Edinburgh Hogmanay looney dook

Edinburgh, Scotland: 1st January 2019 
The Loony Dook takes place on the first day of each new year. Were thousands of brave people dress up in fancy dress and throw themselves into the freezing cold water of the Firth of Forth at South Queensferry, just a few miles out of the Scottish capital. This wonderful event brings an end to the amazing Edinburgh Hogmanay.
Find out more

Harbin Ice and Snow Festival

Harbin, Heilongjiang, China: 5th January 2019 (February 5, 2018) People build incredible things out of ice and snow, decorating them with lights and lasers. Come experience the world's largest ice festival in beautiful Harbin city. where sculptures and ice works of chilly art—all made from ice—are scattered throughout Harbin during this colourful two-month ice and snow sculpture festival each January and February. Find out more.

Sundance Film Festival

Park City, Utah, USA: 24th January - 3rd February 2019 The largest independent film festival in the US and a must for any film fan to Watch both feature-length films and shorts. Find out more.

Up Helly Aa Fire Festival

Lerwick, Scotland: 29th January 2019 
Torches, tar barreling, parties, flamboyant costumes, and the burning of a replica Viking ship make this an exciting festival. Find out more.

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Top Festivals Around the World in February

Published in World Festivals

Top Festivals Around the World in February

Chinese New Year 

Beijing, China: 5th February 2019
(February 16th, 2018) The biggest Chinese holiday, with dragons, fireworks, symbolic clothing, flowers, lanterns, and celebration, everywhere in China. Although Beijing isn’t the only place to celebrate the Chinese New Year it can be celebrated all over Asia. Find out more.


Carnival of Venice

Venice, Italy: 16th February 2019
(February 13, 2018) One of the most beautiful festivals in the world, people wear masks and elaborate costumes to hide differences among classes, and there are contests for the best costumes. Find out more.


Desert Festival of Jaisalmer

Jaisalmer, India: 17th-19th February 2019
(January 29th, 2018) A cultured festival of events such as camel racing, turban tying, and the longest moustache competition, this quirky Indian festival showcases the cultural wonders of Rajasthan. Find out more.

Pingxi Lantern Festival

Pingxi, Taiwan: 19th February 2019
(March 2nd, 2018). People write their wishes on fire lanterns and release them into the sky together, creating a beautiful spectacle of floating lights. Find out more.

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Dublin

Published in Destinations

(Photography by Steven Pratt- Instagram)
Overview

You've probably heard that Guinness tastes better in Dublin (fresh from the factory), but what you may not know is that Dublin is a perfect destination for the whole family. No, we're not suggesting you let the kiddies drink a pint. Instead, take them to the Dublin Zoo, to feed the ducks in Stephen's Green or on a picnic in Phoenix Park. Scholars enjoy walking in the literary footsteps of such writers as Yeats and Joyce, while discerning shoppers have their pick of designer boutiques.
Best Time to Visit

Dublin is delightful year round with many Irish festivals year round, especially St Patrick's day in March, Although the weather is best in summer.
Dublin
 Transportation
Getting around the Dublin area is easy. Jump on the coastal train, the DART, to discover the beautiful towns and villages dotted along the coast, or use the extensive public bus network or the Luas tram system to get you out to the suburbs too as well as bicycle hire throughout the city! If you are here for a few days then the best value across bus and rail options is the Leap Visitor Card.
Dublin Weather
December to February are the coldest months, with an average low of 45°F (7°C) and July is the hottest month, with an average high of 66 °F (19 °C).

Know Before Visiting
Although Dublin is an amazing city, don’t spend all your time there, Ireland is one of the most beautiful countries in the world and to really see Ireland you need to leave the City, go see the spectacular scenery of the Irish coasts.

Language
Mainly English, although you might hear a bit of Irish.
Electric
Type G (three-prong plug)

Currency
Euro (€)
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Things to do
Guinness Storehouse

What better place to begin your Dublin adventure than the city's number one attraction, the Guinness Storehouse. Located in the heart of the St James’s Gate Brewery and home to the black stuff since 1759, this massive seven-storey building, a former Guinness fermentation plant, has been remodelled into the shape of a giant pint of Guinness. A visit will teach you everything you ever wanted to know about this world famous beer. The highlight for many visitors is the Gravity Bar where they receive a complimentary pint of Guinness and a chance to relax and enjoy the breathtaking 360-degree views across Dublin City.

(Photography by Steven Pratt- Instagram)
Opening Times: Daily 09:30-17:00 (Sep-Jun) 09:30-19:00 (Jul-Aug)
Admission Fees: Yes
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: St James's Gate, Ushers, Dublin 8, Ireland
Website: Click Here
Dublin Zoo
See many rare and exotic animals living and roaming in a wide variety of natural habitats at Dublin Zoo. Wander through the African Savannah and gaze at the giraffes, zebras, scimitar oryx and ostrich, then head to the Kaziranga Forest to see the magnificent herd of Asian elephants that call this beautiful place home.

Opening Times: Daily 09:30-4:30 (Mar-sep closes at 18:00)
Admission Fees: Yes
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: Phoenix Park, Dublin 8, Ireland
Website: Click Here

Trinity College Library
Dublin’s Trinity College Library isn’t only the biggest library in Ireland but one of the most eye catching in the world. With over 5 million printed volumes reflecting more than 400 years of academic development. The most famous of its manuscripts, the Book of Kells and the Book of Durrow written around the year 800 AD and is one of the most beautifully illuminated manuscripts in the world. It's 680 pages of vellum contain the Latin texts of the Four Gospels.

Opening Times: Mon-Sat 09:30-17:00 (May-Sep) and 12:00-16:30 (Oct-Apr)
Admission Fees: Yes (for the book of tells and tours)
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: College Street, Dublin 2
Website: Click Here

Temple Bar
Located on the south bank of the River Liffey in central Dublin, Unlike other parts of Dublin's city centre, it is promoted as Dublin's cultural quarter and has a lively nightlife that is popular with tourists. Popular venues include The Palace Bar, The Temple Bar Pub, Oliver St. John Gogarty's and The Auld Dubliner (fine boys bar).

(Photography by Steven Pratt- Instagram)
Opening Times: 24/7
Admission Fees: No
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes (but cobblestone roads)
Address: Temple Bar, Dublin 2, Ireland

National Botanic Gardens
Located on the south bank of the Tolka River, the National Botanic Gardens is a great place to have a picnic and explore the exquisite gardens.

Opening Times: 9:00-17:00
Admission Fees: No
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland
Website: Click Here

The National Gallery of Ireland
Today the National Gallery of Ireland's collection includes over 2,500 paintings and some 10,000 other works in different media including watercolours, drawings, prints and sculpture. The gallery's highlights include works by Vermeer, Caravaggio, Picasso, Van Gogh and Monet.

Opening Times: Mon-Sat 09:15-17:30, Thurs 9:15-20:30 and Sun 11:00-17:30
Admission Fees: No
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: Merrion Square West, Dublin 2, Ireland
Website: Click Here

Croke Park
Gaelic football and hurling at Croke Park are an unusual and essential experience for those with even a modest interest in sport. On match days, make noise on the Hill 16 terrace cheering on the sky blues of Dublin.

Opening Hours: Mon-Sat 0930-1700, Sun 1030-1700 (Jan-May and Sep-Dec); Mon-Sat 0930-1800, Sun 1030-1700 (Jun-Aug).
Admission Fees: Yes
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: Jones Road, Dublin, Dublin 3
Website: Click Here

Kilmainham Gaol
A former prison that housed the leaders of failed uprisings against the British from the 1780s to the 1920s, this museum gives a detailed insight into Ireland’s political history and includes the site of the execution of 14 members of the Easter Rising in 1916. The history of the prison itself is also explored. Access is by guided tour only.

Opening Hours: Daily 0930-1730.
Admission Fees: Yes
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: Inchicore Road, Dublin, Dublin 8
Website: Click Here

Ha'penny Bridge
The Ha'penny Bridge, known later for a time as the Penny Ha'penny Bridge, and officially the Liffey Bridge, is a wonderful pedestrian bridge separating Dublin’s city centre and a popular love lock bridge.

(Photography by Steven Pratt- Instagram)
Opening Hours: 24/7
Admission Fees: No
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: Bachelors Walk, North City, Dublin, Ireland

Public transport
Bus, train (DART) and Luas (tram) from the main transport infrastructure in Dublin, though only the bus makes its way out to the airport.
The Luas is quick and modern, but best for commuting and short city-centre hops.
Dublin Bus is far more extensive and easy to use thanks to sign upgrades and the handy Dublin Bus app.
For travel to the coast, local train services via the DART are frequent and efficient.
Most public transport options don’t run late at night, so you need to make alternative arrangements after midnight.
You can pay for a bus, Luas, DART and suburban rail services using a Leap Card, available online or at 400 Payzone outlets across the city. You load the smartcard with money and the fare is deducted each time you travel, with daily and weekly caps and savings on cash fares. A Rambler card (which you can also load onto a Leap Card) allows five or 30 days of unlimited bus travel.

Taxis
Taxis sit on almost every street corner in Dublin. Well-established companies like Eight Twenty Cabs and NRC are safe bets, while the Hailo app is a popular option. A nightlife ‘rush hour’ at around 3 am invariably leads to long, expensive rides at weekends. Tips are typically in the 10% range.
*Uber is also available in and around Belfast and is a great alternative than Taxies. Click here for your first journey free.

Driving
While driving in the city is generally safe, rush hour traffic (0830-0930 and 1645-1800) can see aggressive driving. Dublin features a somewhat confusing one-way system, based on single-direction traffic along the quays. Outside the city centre though, driving is relaxing and comfortable.
The city’s ring road, the M50, has a camera-based toll that requires online payment within 24 hours.
Street parking is limited in the city centre. The city’s main car parks, with various hourly rates, are Arnotts, Middle Abbey Street, and Brown Thomas, Clarendon Street. For street parking, kerb side pay-and-display meters are standard.

Bicycle hire
While busy times of day can be less than pleasant for nervous riders, cycling is a great way to get around. Dublin Bikes offer a city-wide bike share scheme with lots of central hubs to collect and deposit bikes. 

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Budapest

Published in Destinations

 
Overview

Budapest, the bright capital of Hungary, bisected by the Danube river giving this one city two personalities. Buda built on a series of hills and known for its old town where as Pest is flat and busy with an assortment of bars, cafés and gourmet restaurants.
Best Time to Visit

Budapest is a year-round destination, though it fills with tourists in July and August. The most pleasant time of year to visit is May to June and September when temperatures remain warm but visitor numbers and hotel prices are significantly reduced. Although flights prices may be a little more expensive, the winter months can offer that magical dusting of snow upon the grandiose buildings, which can make this magnificent city even more magical.

Budapest
 Transportation
Budapest’s extensive transportation system is run by BKK (Link), Which offer a metro, tram, bus and rail service. All the lines connect together to make your transportation experience as simple as possible.
Budapest Weather
Hungary has a mild continental climate. There are four distinct seasons, with a very warm summer from June to August where temperatures can rise to as high as 35°C (95°F). Spring and autumn are mild, while winters are very cold, as low as -10°C (14°F), although expert some snow during your winter city break.

Know Before Visiting
Although Budapest is the capital of Hungary there can be quite a language barrier, as English isn’t as widely spoken as other European countries like Amsterdam. We would therefore advice to learn some basic Hungarian Phrases before you arrive to get the most out of Budapest. 

Language
Hungarian

Electric
C, E and F type plugs generally fit on Hungarian electricity sockets. 
Currency
Hungarian forint (HUF) 
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Belfast

Published in Destinations

 
Overview

Belfast, the historic capital of Northern Ireland, home to the RMS Titanic, Game of Thrones and the Ulster Fry, this rejuvenated city has a story to tell. Explore the many museums, murals, restaurants and true Irish bars for the ultimate city break.
Best Time to Visit

Belfast is brilliant year round with many festivals such as Culture Night in September, Feile an Phobail in August, St Patrick's day in March and the wintery Christmas market. Although the weather can get quite rainy and cold year round so pack an umbrella.
Belfast
Transportation
The Translink transport service offers Belfast an easy to navigate bus, train and coach service. Grab a Metro day ticket that will take you in and around the city for £3.90 (£3.40 after 9:30 am). Belfast is quite compact though so wear a comfortable pair of shoes and you could walk the famous streets.
Belfast Weather
December to February are the coldest months, with an average low of 45°F (7°C) and July is the hottest month, with an average high of 66 °F (19 °C).

Know Before Visiting
Belfast is a relatively new European city that offers some brilliant attractions but due to rules and regulations, a lot of bars, nightclubs, and shops close quite early so be sure to check closing times and Sunday opening hours.

Language
English

Electric
Type G (three-prong plug)

Currency
British Pound (£)
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Things to do
Titanic Belfast
Possibly the greatest museum in the whole of Ireland, the six-storey Titanic Belfast sits near the docks where the ‘unsinkable’ ship was built. The same height as its namesake – and designed suspiciously like an iceberg – this informative, interactive and entertaining museum takes visitors from conception and launch through to the eventual sinking and discovery of Belfast’s most infamous ship.
Opening Times: Daily 1000-1700 (Jan-Mar), daily 0900-1800 (Apr-May), daily 0900-1900 (Jun-Aug), 0900-1800 (Sep), daily 1000-1700 (Oct-Dec)
Admission Fees: Yes
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: 1 Olympic Way, Queens Road, Titanic Quarter, Belfast BT3 9EP
Website: Click Here

Belfast Castle
More Victorian mansion than traditional fortress, Belfast Castle combines Scottish baronial style with baroque features, and owes much of its popularity to its superb location on the lower slopes of Cave Hill. Offering the best possible panorama of the city. Try afternoon tea in its Cellar Restaurant.
Opening Times: Sun-Mon 0900-1800, Tues-Sat 0900-2230
Admission Fees: No
Wheelchair Friendly: No
Address: Antrim Rd, Belfast BT15 5GR
Website: Click Here

Crumlin Road Gaol
Popular with ex-inmates (so we’re told), the Crumlin Road Goal is a large Victorian prison that carries the cold chill of a condemned man. Hour-long tours revive its stories of semtex bombs, executions, unmarked graves and escapees, whilst allowing visitors to peek into cells and gawp at the gallows.
Opening Times: Daily 1000-1745
Admission Fees: Yes
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: 53-55 Crumlin Rd, Belfast BT14 6ST
Website: Click Here


Botanic Gardens
These lovely gardens, provide a wonderful respite from the University Quarter. Now a public park, its beautiful cast-iron and curvilinear glass Palm House remains the centrepiece – though it could do with a lick of paint. The Tropical Ravine looks derelict but is being renovated, while its rose garden, bowling green and walking routes leave plenty to peruse.
Opening Hours: Daily from 0730. Closing times vary throughout the year (see website).
Admission Fees: No
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: College Park E, Belfast BT7 1LP
Website: Click Here

Ulster Museum
Expect to lose half a day at Northern Ireland’s national museum and art gallery. A veritable jackdaw’s nest of British, Irish and European paintings, local crafts and Irish history, its ground floor exhibition has a good overview of the Troubles.
Opening Hours: Tues-Sun 1000-1700
Admission Fees: No
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: Botanic Gardens, Belfast BT9 5AB
Website: Click Here

 

Peace Walls
Rising to 7.6m (25ft) in height, the Peace Walls are a prison-like fence of concrete, corrugated steel and wire that separate nationalist and loyalist neighbourhoods. A psychical reminder of the division caused by The Troubles, tours take in the Falls and Shankill Roads and cover clash points as well as the murals that depict those lost in three decades of fighting. For historical context, visit on a black cab tour or with a guide, most of whom have experienced the Troubles first-hand.
Opening Hours: 0900-1800 (Peace Wall gates)
Admission Fees: No
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: 15 Cupar Way, Belfast BT13


St George’s Market

Originally peddling poultry, butter and eggs in the late 1800s, a refit and reshuffle has turned this Victorian arcade into Belfast’s trendiest shopping destination. Now selling everything from fish to flamenco music, there are nearly 300 stalls to check out, with a variety market on Fridays, food and crafts being sold on Saturdays and antique stands on Sundays.
Opening Hours: Fri 0600-1400, Sat 0900-1500, Sun 1000-1600.
Admission Fees: No
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: 12-20 East Bridge Street, Belfast BT1 3NQ
Website: Click Here

SS Nomadic
SS Nomadic is the last remaining ship built by the White Star Line. This plucky tender, which took passengers to RMS Titanic from Cherbourg, has been fully restored and now relives its glory days in a dry dock.
Opening Hours: Tue-Sun 1000-1700 (Oct-Mar); Mon-Sun 1000-1700 (Apr-Sep)
Admission Fees: yes
Wheelchair Friendly: no
Address: Hamilton Dock, Queens Rd, Belfast BT3 9DT
Website: Click Here

W5
Ireland’s Award Winning Science & Discovery Centre perfect for kids and With over 250 amazing interactive exhibits in four incredible exhibition areas, W5 provides a unique experience for visitors. In addition to permanent exhibits, W5 also presents a changing programme of large and small scale temporary exhibitions and events.
Opening Hours: mon-fri 1000-1700; sat 1000-1800 sun 1200-1800
Admission Fees: yes
Wheelchair Friendly: Yes
Address: The Odyssey, 2 Queens Quay, Belfast BT3 9QQ
Website: Click Here

Public transport
Transport in Belfast is efficient. The city has a good bus service (rather confusingly called The Metro) operated by Translink . The service runs approximately every 10 minutes throughout the day, and there is a less frequent night service.

You can buy single tickets or day passes directly from the driver. Alternatively, you can save money by loading trips onto a Smartlink Multi-Journey Card or by buying a dayLink card, which offers unlimited travel for one, five or 10 days. Weekly and monthly smartcards are also available. Smartcards are sold at Translink sales outlets throughout the city.
The Belfast Visitor Pass allows unlimited bus and rail travel for one, two or three consecutive days, as well as discounts on visitor attractions. You can buy it at the Belfast Welcome Centre. There are five bus stations scattered throughout the city; the main one is the Europa Bus Centre located at Glengall Street, off Great Victoria Street.

Taxis
In Belfast taxis operate from taxi ranks. One of the main taxi ranks in Belfast city centre is in front of City Hall, Adelaide Street. There are two types of Belfast Taxis: the London-style black cabs, and standard saloon cars which bear the name of the taxi company on the car roof. All taxis display a yellow disc on the car windscreen and are required to display coloured licence plates (black taxis display yellow plates and private taxis green plates). Never take a taxi without coloured plates. It is common practice to normally round up the fare.
*Uber is also available in and around Belfast and is a great alternative than Taxies. Click here for your first journey free.
Driving
Belfast is a relatively straightforward city to drive in, although the city is so compact and well served by public transport that most visitors will have no need of a car. If you do decide to drive, there are plenty of car parks in the city centre (charges apply). To pay for off-street car parks or on-street metered parking, you can either pay with coins or register with Parkmobile (www.parkmobile.co.uk) and pay using your mobile phone or online. Parking on Sundays is usually free.
Bicycle hire
Belfast is becoming a cycle-friendly city as the city now has its own bicycle-sharing scheme called Belfast Bikes. There are 300 bicycles spread out across the city in 30 docking stations and are available to hire daily between 6 am and midnight. Before hiring a bike, you must register either online or at a docking station. The first 30 minutes are free.

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Dos And Don’ts Of Eating In Europe

Published in Essentials

Dos and Don’ts of Eating In Europe
Everyone gets ripped off at one time or another while travelling and it seems to be more common when there can be a language barrier. So we are going to do our best to arm you with a little bit of knowledge to avoid being ripped off in Europe’s restaurants and cafes so you can get back to the serious business of eating some of Europe’s most delicious food.

The farther away from a tourist site you eat, the less likely you are to be ripped off
It’s a sad truth that in some less-than-honest establishments, tourists can be seen as easy prey. Restaurants and cafes right near the big tourist sites are the most likely candidates. It’s not always the case of course, but well-located eateries that don’t cater to a local (and therefore repeat) market are more likely to charge inflated prices.

Avoid restaurants and cafes with a host outside forcing you in.
Another tip-off that you’re in a touristy establishment: There’s a “host” outside the door asking you to come in (any restaurant catering to locals, won’t have this since they’ll rely on word-of-mouth)

Where you sit can really affect the price

It is quite common in cities like Rome, Paris, and Amsterdam that you will have to charge differently depending on where you sit. In Rome for example, you will find it cheaper to have a coffee or drink at the bar and may notice different prices for “banco” (standing) and one for “tavolo” (sitting).
Also in places like Paris and many other European cities restaurants may charge extra to sit outside ‘al fresco’, so be aware of any charges.

Understanding charges on your bill
You may find in some European cities that there can be extra fees or charges on your bill. In Rome, for example, you may see ‘“pane e coperto’ on your bill which is a charge for your bread that is generally not per basket but per head. You may also find almost all restaurants in Europe will charge you for water.

Understanding when to tip
Restaurant tips are more modest in Europe than in America. At restaurants, check the menu to see if service is included; if it isn’t, a tip of 5–10 percent is normal. In most places, 10 percent is a big tip. As a matter of principle, if not economy, the local price should prevail. Please believe me — tipping 15 or 20 percent in Europe is unnecessary, if not culturally ignorant.
Tipping is an issue only at restaurants that have waiters and waitresses. If you order your food at a counter (in a pub, for example), don’t tip. The “service charge” (Servizio in Italian, service in French, servicio in Spanish) can be handled in different ways. Sometimes the menu will note that the service is included (“servizio incluso”), meaning that the prices listed on the menu already have this charge built in. When the service is not included (“servizio non incluso”), the service charge might show up as a separate line item at the end of your bill.

If you can, check for reviews 
The best way to know what you're getting before you get it is to look at genuine non-biased reviews. By using Tripadvisor or Mytable, which both offer an honest rating of the restaurant, bar or cafe. You can also search restaurants near you and can also specify if you want cheap eats or fancy 5-star cuisine. 

Find A Park, Pack a picnic
To keep the cost down and live like a local,grab a take-away sandwich from a bakery or Supermarket and have a picnic. Picnics can be an adventurous money saving option. Also be aware In stores, unrefrigerated soft drinks, bottled water, and beer are one-third the price of cold drinks. Avoid buying drinks to go at streetside stands; you'll find them far cheaper in a shop.

Be aware of cultural differences
Keep in mind that by Uk/American standards, many Europeans such as the French undercook meats: rare or saignantis close to raw; medium or à point is rare; and well-done or bien cuit is medium. Also keep in mind that in an around certain cities of Europe you may find raw eggs put on top of items such as Pizza.

Have fun and enjoy some of the best Cuisines in the world.

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